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Technology

Timeless IMS: Connecting People, Connecting Companies

Modern businesses rely upon a managed technology ecosystem which ensures peak performance, reliability and security.

Timeless IMS are an Intelligent Managed Solutions Provider (iMSP) that have the skill set and depth of resources to provide not only IT support and services, but comprehensive business and application consulting. Our aim is to optimise and manage the entire IT environment for an organisation and provide measurable return on investment.

• We are an iMSP that is best placed to deliver an excellent integrated offering and superior service
• At Timeless IMS we believe your organisation revolves on your people and that both your organisation and your people need managed technology to help achieve your business goals
• Timeless IMS have evolved over the last fifteen years from being an IT support company, supporting both single home users as well as large multi-site corporations, to growing into one of the UK’s first iMSP’s

Timeless IMS was founded by Michael Ramlakhan, following a career in Finance and IT over fifteen years ago. The business has evolved in this time to offer Intelligent Managed Solutions across four key areas of technology; Intelligence, People, Security and Cloud.

This is achieved through integrated consultancy, procurement, project management, deployment and ongoing managed support services.
At Timeless IMS we have the capability to align business processes and critical applications with tactical goals so that the entire IT infrastructure is designed, managed, and maintained around your company’s overall business strategy and growth plans.

We have the capacity and capability to see the entire IT ecosystem along with business operations and then view it as a complete, fully-integrated entity.

We will work with your organisation to understand the operational processes that underpin business functionality, continuity and growth. This kind of comprehensive and expanded managed services support can only come from the next-generation of MSP – an integrated managed service provider, we are the trusted partner that you can rely on to deliver these solutions for your company.

REAL WORLD EXAMPLES OF WHAT WE DO:
-PUBLIC WIRELESS CONNECTIONS
-MANAGED INTELLIGENT FIREWALLS TO PROTECT  NETWORKS
-HI SPEED PRIVATE INTERNET CONNECTIONS
-AI FOCUSED CCTV SOLUTIONS
-MANAGED HELPDESK & ONSITE SUPPORT SERVICES

MICHAEL HAS WORKED IN THE AREA OF TECHNOLOGY FOR OVER 30 YEARS AND CREATED TIMELESS AFTER SEEING AN OVERWHELMING NEED TO CREATE A CUSTOMER CENTRIC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY; ONE THAT OFFERED A BETTER KIND OF IT SERVICE ACROSS THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND NOW ACROSS LONDON AND THE SOUTH OF ENGLAND. MICHAEL IS A RESPECTED AND ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE ASHFORD COMMUNITY. HE IS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE SPELTHORNE BUSINESS FORUM, A LONG-STANDING MEMBER OF THE ASHFORD ROTARY CLUB, A LOCAL SCHOOL GOVERNOR AND FOUNDER OF THE ASHFORD WIDE COMMUNITY GROUP.

Find out more about Timeless IMS at http://www.timelessims.co.ukor email sales@timelessims.co.uk

Announcing the Place West London Conference 2018

Place West London

Featuring guest speaker – Daniel Mouawad, Chief Executive of Spelthorne Borough Council.

Place West London’s combination of a high-level conference programme and business networking opportunities focussed on West London is unique. It’s the place for anyone involved in the sub-region to get together, share ideas, discuss the future, and make new contacts.

Attendees are drawn from:
The Public Sector
 – local authorities send senior Officers and Members  active and interested in planning, economic development, regeneration, housing, transport, environment and more.

Associations, academia and interest groups – locally based groups like Chambers of Commerce, representative membership bodies, universities and colleges send delegates to the event.

Regeneration and property – regeneration companies, property developers, investors and consultants are present, many as sponsors.

Businesses & Occupiers – many private sector operations based in West London and with a stake in its future come to use the opportunity to get their views heard, and network with others.

MORE DETAILS AND TO BOOK – HERE

Why small business owners should move their business communications to the cloud

How a Cloud-Based Solution Could Benefit Your Business

As more and more start-ups embrace a flexible approach to working, the cloud can ensure that your team never misses a call, email or potential lead again…

In recent years, the advancement of digital technology has driven business practice through some pretty seismic shifts. And thanks to developments in smartphones, cloud tech and other portable devices and apps, it’s now possible to run an entire business empire from the palm of your hand.

With the rising prices of office space, many of the UK’s small business owners are embracing the opportunities offered by this technology – choosing the more affordable, flexible and low-risk option of running the business remotely from home, a co-work space or a local wi-fi hotspot.

This is simple enough if you’re a lone wolf, but as your business grows and you hire more remote staff, you’ll need to obtain a secure and reliable system through which to communicate and share information with them across multiple locations.

You’ll also need to think about your clients: if your team is spread across the country, how can you ensure that all customer phone calls are answered, and by the right person for each query? As a small business, you can’t afford to miss – or mess up – calls; it could potentially cost you business.

Even if your staff aren’t remote, a cloud-based communications system for smoothly directing calls to particular team members, and enabling access to send emails and collaborate on email calendars, will have huge benefits – and save you money.

Read more here…

International Women’s Day Event at Heathrow

Heathrow

 

You’re invited… Heathrow’s International Women in Engineering Event

Heathrow are inviting young females aged 12 years+ to join them for an exciting careers day at Heathrow.

There will be opportunities to meet highly successful women doing amazing jobs at the airport.

 

Heathrow’s International Women in Engineering Event takes place on Friday  22 June 2018, 9.30am-3.30pm.

Their exciting day includes:

–   Chance to meet successful women working in engineering/construction

–   Unique opportunity to go airside and see a live construction project

–    Lunch

–    Q&A with Heathrow apprentices/graduates

–    CV workshop/training

 

Want to take part?

If this sounds like your school, drop them an email now to:  Altitude@heathrow.com and register your interest. They’ll be in touch to let you know if your school has been selected as one of the lucky ones to take part.

This is a fun and exciting way for students to learn about Heathrow and be inspired by careers in science and technology.

 

Feature fatigue – How can this affect usability?

With advancements in technology, it’s become all too tempting, and easy, for tech companies to dump as many features into their products as they can in the hope that each new feature will serve as a key point of differentiation.

Their logic is sound if sales is their only goal. Customer satisfaction and loyalty are, however, destined to suffer. Research has proven over and over again that consumers place high value on the range of a product’s capabilities at the time of purchase, with a “more-features-the-merrier” attitude. To the contrary, though, customer satisfaction diminishes over time as they struggle to use a product that they find to be overly complex.

The incidence of “feature fatigue” suggests that today’s tech companies should focus on providing a range of specialised, targeted products with a limited number of well-researched, well-designed features in order to increase customer lifetime value.

Usability has become the driver of great product design

Consider this: when Apple released the iPad, critics poked fun at the new device, claiming it was but a mere iPod with a larger screen and fewer features. Consumers, however, thought otherwise. Rather than focusing on what the product lacked, they appreciated its intuitive, purposefully-tailored design. In circumventing the features rat race, the iPad disrupted an entire industry with its focus on simplicity and usability.

Read full article here.

Emerging technologies: disrupting the future

Dr Hayaatun Sillem, chief executive of the Royal Academy of Engineering, says that the Academy’s scheme to support UK visionaries gives her confidence in the country’s future as a world leader in science and engineering

Emerging technologies are defined as new or evolving technologies with the potential to change the status quo – and in some instances, where their impact is very widespread and they displace old technologies, they might become what are known as disruptive technologies. The UK has a strong history of pioneering such technologies, building on its world-class research base and culture of invention and creativity.

One chair is aimed at accelerating translation of biotherapetic systems for the brain from lab to industry

As part of the government’s National Productivity Investment Fund, the Academy has been allocated funding to accelerate the development and commercialisation of emerging technologies within the UK through 10 new flagship Chairs in Emerging Technologies (CET) at UK universities. The CET scheme identifies research and innovation visionaries and provides them with long-term support to enable them to build a global centre of excellence focussed on emerging technologies with high potential to deliver economic and social benefit to the UK. This type of public investment can be highly effective in stimulating co-investment from the private sector, enabling the UK to secure an early foothold in a potentially important future market and preventing UK companies from losing their competitive advantage as other countries take a lead.

The call for the CET scheme has also shone a light on what UK engineering researchers consider to be today’s significant emerging technologies. It is exciting to see both the diversity of technologies and disciplines represented among the chairs selected and the breadth of societal challenges and economic opportunities that have motivated the world-leading engineers appointed. The chairs also provide a vivid illustration of the fact that use-inspired research can be as intellectually rigorous as it is potentially transformative.

Perhaps unsurprisingly a number of the chairs focus on technologies with strong medical applications. One aims to deliver a step change in personalised medicine by engineering cells that can combine precise disease diagnosis with therapeutic intervention in a closed loop circuit to prevent the disease developing or provide a cure – sometimes called ‘theranostics’. Another focuses on reducing the burden of brain disorders. The goal of the chair is to accelerate the translation of therapeutic bioelectronic systems – for example a ‘brain pacemaker’ – from lab to industry.

Robotics, autonomous systems and AI also had strong representation among the chairs selected. For example, one chair addresses the technologies underpinning soft robotics, which have the potential to impact upon many areas of our lives, from implantable medical devices that restore function after cancer or stroke, to wearable soft robotics that will keep us mobile in our old age and biodegradable robots that can combat pollution and monitor the environment. Other chairs address issues of safety and reliability associated with AI and robotic systems – a topic of great societal importance and current interest.

Another significant focus was on driving improvement in materials that underpin important industrial and societal applications. One of the chairs will develop novel interactive technologies using acoustic metamaterials; another is targeted at optimisation of next generation battery materials for improved cost, performance and durability.

The remainder of the chairs draw upon other recent advances in the physical sciences to address novel areas. They include radical new space technologies that will underpin entirely new satellite applications, an integrated approach to two-dimensional classical and quantum photonics and a platform for multiscale industrial design, from the level of molecules to machines.

The CET scheme steering group, chaired by AI and open data pioneer Sir Nigel Shadbolt FREng FRS, were deeply impressed by the quality of applications they reviewed, which bodes well for the UK’s ability to continue to be at the leading edge of technology disruption. Nevertheless, it is notoriously difficult to forecast with any accuracy which technologies will turn out to have the most significant impacts over the long term, and what those impacts will be. The profound extent to which mobile communications, the internet and World Wide Web have changed our lives is now taken for granted, but this future impact was far from obvious when the early underpinning research was undertaken.

Another hugely important disruptive technology which had a less than auspicious start is GPS – the Global Positioning System – which was built on early work to help with the navigation of nuclear submarines. The US began deploying a more robust multi-use system in 1978, but full operational capability was achieved only in 1993, and the programme was almost cancelled in the meantime. Yet GPS is now ubiquitous – so much so that the deep dependence of critical infrastructure on this single platform has been highlighted as a significant risk by the Academy and others over the last few years.

I was recently asked whether I thought there was a way of identifying which technologies would go on to have pervasive impacts before it became obvious that they would. Trying to predict the future is (famously) a mug’s game but I am pretty optimistic that we can learn something from running competitions like this and tracking developments as our Chairs in Emerging Technologies get to work. Moreover, I am excited to see what insights will emerge when we bring our chairs together from across their varied backgrounds and areas of expertise to reflect on what the future might look like.

See original article here.